EPG GAS ​

Gaseous Mercury

Stan Said we have Several Option no Doubt he studied all of them 
One being discussed is Mercury vapor with argon, and UnUnPentium 
the more electrons on the outer shell the better the stronger the magnetic response, 

When photonic light is added  aka laser the  magnetism increases, they use that technique in mri scanning to identify gases 

We also can use h1 helium and plasma  in form of toroid smoke rings as they are magnetic 

Dan

You can also make a permanent magnet out of a loop of superconducting mercury. Simply cool down a loop of mercury in an external magnetic field (the temperature at which the mercury will superconduct will get lower as the applied field gets stronger).

 

After the mercury becomes superconducting, it locks in the total magnetic flux through the loop. Switch off the external magnetic field, and a persistent current will flow around the mercury loop, making a permanent magnetic field. 

Many compounds containing mercury are also weak diamagnets, but some are a little stronger than mercury itself. It probably is possible to make an alloy of iron and mercury which is magnetizable, but that wouldn't be the mercury's doing. 

The mercury in the tube is a liquid at normal temperatures. It needs to be vaporized and ionized before the lamp can produce its full light output. To facilitate starting of the lamp, a third electrode is mounted near one of the main electrodes and connected through a resistor to the other main electrode. In addition to the mercury, the tube is filled with argon gas at low pressure.

 

When power is applied, there is sufficient voltage to ionize the argon and strike a small arc between the starting electrode and the adjacent main electrode. When ionsphotons, and free electrons have been introduced into the arc tube, an arc initiates between the two main electrodes. The heat from this arc vaporizes the liquid mercury inside the lamp which radiates green, yellow, violet, and ultraviolet emission lines when ionized. Continued vaporization of the liquid mercury increases the arc tube pressure to between 2 and 18 bar, depending on lamp size. The increase in pressure results in further brightening of the lamp.[8][9] The entire warm-up process takes roughly 4 to 7 minutes. Some bulbs include a thermal switch which shorts the starting electrode to the adjacent main electrode, extinguishing the starting arc once the main arc strikes.

The mercury vapor lamp is a negative resistance device. This means its resistance decreases as the current through the tube increases. So if the lamp is connected directly to a constant-voltage source like the power lines, the current through it will increase until it destroys itself. Therefore, it requires a ballast to limit the current through it. Mercury vapor lamp ballasts are similar to the ballasts used with fluorescent lamps. In fact, the first British fluorescent lamps were designed to operate from 80-watt mercury vapor ballasts. There are also self-ballasted mercury vapor lamps available. These lamps use a tungsten filament in series with the arc tube both to act as a resistive ballast and add full spectrum light to that of the arc tube. Self-ballasted mercury vapor lamps can be screwed into a standard incandescent light socket supplied with the proper voltage.

Q & A: Magnetism of Mercury

Related Questions

Still Curious?
Explore Q&As in related categories

Magnets
The Elements

Most recent answer: 11/30/2016

Q:

Is mercury, on both an elemental and compound basis, a material that could be magnetized? 
- Natalie 
Florida, USA

A:

At room temperature, the element mercury is not very magnetic at all. It has a very small, negative magnetic susceptibility, meaning that when you put mercury in a magnetic field, it magnetizes just a little tiny bit in the opposite direction. We say that mercury is a weakly diamagnetic substance at room temperature. 

Many compounds containing mercury are also weak diamagnets, but some are a little stronger than mercury itself. It probably is possible to make an alloy of iron and mercury which is magnetizable, but that wouldn't be the mercury's doing. 

Mercury is much more interesting magnetically at very low temperatures. At temperatures below about 4 degrees Kelvin, elemental mercury becomes a superconductor. In fact, superconductivity was discovered by Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911 by studying mercury at low temperatures. 

Superconductors generally expel magnetic fields, so you could say that below 4 K, mercury is a perfect diamagnet. To expel a magnetic field from a material, a canceling field must be created by that material with currents flowing on the surface. These currents flow with no resistance in superconductors. 

You can also make a permanent magnet out of a loop of superconducting mercury. Simply cool down a loop of mercury in an external magnetic field (the temperature at which the mercury will superconduct will get lower as the applied field gets stronger). After the mercury becomes superconducting, it locks in the total magnetic flux through the loop. Switch off the external magnetic field, and a persistent current will flow around the mercury loop, making a permanent magnetic field. 

Tom J. 

(published on 10/22/2007)

Follow-Up #1: When superconducting magnets go normal

Q:

When u make a permanent magnet out of mercury at below 4 kelvin. what happens to the mercury and the magnetic field, when the mercury is brought up in temperature? would like to know TY for your time and great answers.
- Bruce W. (age 28)
Clearlake Califonia USA

A:

As that superconducting current loop warms up, it will switch to the normal state, which has electrical resistance. The current will rapidly run down, and the magnetic field will go away. As the field rapidly changes, a pulse of electromagnetic radiation will propagate outward. The mercury will also pick up some extra heat.

I think that pretty much covers it.

Mike W.

 

(published on 07/21/2012)

Follow-Up #2: cooling superconductor in field

Q:

If the mercury was super cooled right after the moment of release of field, would it recapture the field? If it was the nearest metal object? Ty again and sorry can't stop the gears in my head.
- Bruce W. (age 28)
Clearlake Ca USA

A:

This doesn't really sound like something that could happen. Remember that the mercury won't go normal until the temperature reaches the transition temperature (which is slightly lowered by the presence of the field and the current). Once the mercury goes normal, there's a burst of heating from the current flowing through the resistance, so the mercury goes well above the transition temperature. I can't think of any way to actually re-cool the mercury until the field that it had is gone.

Now an exception comes up if there's something else trapping the field in the region of the mercury. An external superconducting cylinder would be one example. Then re-cooling the mercury will capture some field again. The field inside the mercury ring will go up just slightly, because the field that had penetrated the mercury will partly be pushed inside the ring and partly outside the ring.

Mike W.

 

(published on 07/23/2012)

Follow-Up #3: magnetic panning for gold with mercury

Q:

I've been panning gold for a few years and much of my gold has mercury on it. I recently got a rare earth magnet about 60Lb or 80 I forget the Lb but I read that mercury is magnetic and that it switchs on and off depending on where the nutrons and protrons and all are as they spin around. When they come close they switch on and as they sepperat off. So I took my magnet and with the mercury coated gold in a glas vial filled with water i started swipeing it along the gold and it did pull all of the coated gold from one end of the vial to the other. Not like a really stron pull but stron enought it only took about 10 swipes to move all of it from one end to the other of the vial. A second vial of my clean gold I keep sepperat from the gold with mercury coating I did same test to see if maybe it was not the mercury but another metal mixed in with the gold. I could not get a single speck of the uncoated gold to move.
- Robert Way (age 55)
Greensboro NC

A:

Both mercury and gold are very weakly diamagnetic, i.e. repelled by magnetic fields. This effect might in principle let you push them ahead of the field, but it is almost certainly too weak to work in practice. You say the particles were "pulled", which would not fit this picture.

Now there's another possible mechanism. Gold and mercury are conductors. That means that changing magnetic fields stir up eddy currents in them. That gives them temporary magnetic moments. If this is how you're moving them, I'd predict that if you tried moving the magnet slowly, it wouldn't work, since it's the rate of change of the field that counts.

But why would nothing happen without the mercury? Two reasons:
1. The mercury helps form bigger blobs of conducting metal, allowing for more eddy currents.
2. The mercury can lubricate things, reducing friction.

Try the slow-motion experiment and let us know how it comes out.

Mike W.

 

(published on 10/16/2012)

Follow-Up #4: superconducting levitation

Q:

Ok i know that i'm going to sound like an antigravity theorist or someone that watched the movie "Contact" one too many times but I am really curious as to what would happen if you put liquid mercury inside a gyroscope made of conductive metal, lowered the temp below 4k, added an electrical current to each ring (creating a magnetic field in each i think) and then spun each ring in a different direction. both on a large and small scale. sorry if this is a ridiculous question.
- derek (age 36)
cornelius oregon USA

A:

It's hard to follow the description of where the currents are flowing, but we can answer your more general question. Mercury will go superconducting when it's cold enough, and superconductors can be used to levitate magnets or other superconductors. 

Mike W.

About Us

Secure Supplies Media Group is

an international collective of Hot Rodders photographers, writers & drivers with a shared passion for promoting the world's most exciting

Hydrogen car culture stories.

Team Secure

Editor in Chief: Daniel Donatelli 
Senior Editor: Simone White
Editor at Large: Johny Case
Commercial Director: Willem Coetzee
Community Manager: Ryan
Butters
Technical Editor: Jason Nash
Concept Artist:  Samuel Hill
Senior Contributors:  Jacky Bright
Contributors:  Sally Smith, Joanne Livey, Bruce Smith.

Contact Us

We're always very interested to hear your own stories as well as to receive your feedback.

Please New Members first but if you don't find what you are looking for then you are welcome to contact us via email, thank you.

Secure Supplies  Social

 Facebook- @SecureSupplies

 Twitter      - @SecureSupplies

 Instagram - SecureSupplies

 Pinterest   - Secure.Supplies

Event Partners

Untitled.png

Automotive Partners

logo.jpg

Back to Main Site 

www.securesupplyusa.com

Merchandise Partners

Manufacturing  Partners

Manufacturing.png

Secure Supplies Energy Power Gas Magazine ™

All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Copyright © 2012 Secure Supplies Limited Daniel Donatelli © 2009 

TRADEMARKS BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 No duplication is permitted of this site graphically or
conceptually unless requested and approved in writing.

TERMS OF SERVICE // PRIVACY & COOKIE POLICY // LEGAL NOTICES // ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES

Work with us Employment