MMW = Milliliters per Minute per Watt

 

I am not sure this is of any value. None of us have the proper instruments, calibrated for accuracy, to make the measurements needed to get a true MMW. My instruments will measure different from yours. Yours will measure different from someone else's. There are two many variables to overcome.

 

So I ask the big question. Who do you need to impress, or convince? Certainly not me. There are more things to consider; such as temperature - which is constantly changing. Temperature changes will affect the resistance of the cell, which will affect the amperage, which will affect the MMW calculation.

 

Do you use a PWM? The electrical current is not constant if you do. MMW uses a constant 100% current for the calculation. In addition, the voltage changes with the use of a PWM. That is, unless you have it set for 100% duty cycle; anything less is a variable. Don't forget the frequency of the PWM. It is turning the current on and off, steadily.

 

At best, all you can hope for is a Base figure; one that basically represents your measurements and calculations, using your equipment, your method of using a stop-watch, your method of measuring the HHO output. It will not be exact, and should be quoted as such.

The efficiency of an HHO generator is determined by how much HHO is produced, compared to the energy put into it.  This is only important for you to know so you get the best quality product possible. 
You may see a term like  4.4 MMW in an HHO generator add. 

MMW = milliliters / minute / watt

This is simply stating how many milliliters are produced per watt in a minutes time. The higher the number the more efficient the generator. Also, the less heat the generator will produce. 

Typical efficiencies for dry cells  are from 4.4mmw to 5.65 MMW

Example of the MMW formula:

Voltage 12.65   x  Amps  13   =  Watts  164.45

Minutes            1
Milliliter         1000

1000 divided by 1 =   1000          1000 divided by 164.45 = 6.081     MMW=         6.081

Now, after watching just those two videos, you see .

 

 

 

 

  MMW Calculator Link 

 

 

 

 

 

A look at Faraday Efficiency:

 

.627 Liters per hour per amp is representative of 100% Faraday Efficiency at 32oF and 1 atm pressure.

The ratio of .627 liters per hour per amp is the same thing as .627 divided by 60 minutes to get .01045 liters per minute per amp and then, because there are 1000 milliliters in a liter, multiplied by 1000 to get 10.45 milliliters per minute per amp.

So, let's take another short look at how we can get there.

 

First, we can perform the calculation for the half reaction for Hydrogen in the electrolysis of water to find it's theoretical volume produced per minute per amp.

 

This point is interesting  theoretical? Stan may 180% more yeild than traditional methods calculated  here. 

 

Electrical Charge in Coulombs (C) = t X I (60 seconds X 1 Amp) = 60 C

The volume of Hydrogen, or any gas for that matter, per mole is a given value. At standard pressure and temperature, the volume of Hydrogen per mole is 22.414 Liters or 22,414 Milliliters which, by the way, is the Ideal Gas Constant (0.0820574587) multiplied by the Standard Temperature in Kelvins (273.15 K which is equal to 0 C or 32 F). Also, this is the point in the calculation where temperature corrections are made to adjust the volume per mole.

 

For example, many people will use what is commonly referred to as "room temperature" (25 C = 77 F = 298 K) to make these calculations which makes the volume of gas per mole = Ideal Gas Constant (0.0820574587) multiplied by room temperature in Kelvins (298 K) = 24.4531226926 Liters or 24,453 Milliliters per mole. In order to make this more clear, I will carry out this example throughout these calculations.

 

Anyway, 1 mole of Hydrogen yields 2 moles of electrons.

The electrical charge of one mole of electrons (Faraday's Constant) is given as 96,485 C (1 Faraday). Since we have two moles of electrons, the electrical charge delivered by one mole of Hydrogen = 2 X 96,485 C or 192,970 C.

Hydrogen volume = Electrical charge in Coulombs (60 C) / (divided by) Electrical charge delivered by one mole of

 

Hydrogen (192,970 C) X (multiplied by) Hydrogen Volume per mole (22,414 milliliters or 24,453 milliliters at room temperature ) =

60 C / 192,970 C = .000311

.000311 X 22,414 = 6.97 milliliters

Or, at room temperature (298 K)

.000311 X 24,453 = 7.60 milliliters

 

Hydroxy contains 100% more Hydrogen than Oxygen, so we need to add 50% of 6.29 which brings us up to 10.45 milliliters. Okay, let's verify that again by performing the calculations for the other half reaction for Oxygen and adding it to our results for Hydrogen.

Instead of 2 moles of electrons like we had for Hydrogen, we have 4 moles of electrons for Oxygen, so 4 X 96,485 C = 385,940 C/mole.

60 C / 385,940 C = 0.000155

0.000155 X 22,414 = 3.48 milliliters of Oxygen

Or, at room temperature (298 K):

.000155 X 24,453 = 3.80 milliliters

 

Now,

 

6.97 milliliters Hydrogen + 3.48 milliliters Oxygen = 10.45 milliliters of Hydroxy per minute per amp per cell.

Or, at room temperature (298 K):

7.60 milliliters Hydrogen + 3.80 milliliters Oxygen = 11.4 milliliters of Hydroxy per minute per amp per cell.

To correct for pressure, you just divide that final number by the atmospheric pressure represented in units of atm (atmospheres). Most local weather stations report atmospheric pressure in millibars or hectopascals (both the same thing). You can convert that to atmospheres by multiplying the value given in millibars or hectopascals by .0009869233

 

 

 

WARNING The above may be Misleading  BABBLE  

whilst trivial to know, and debatable whether important.

the real secret is turning Ni and H into NH3 in air intake.

 

 

 

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